Boho-Chic

sienna-boho is a of female fashion drawing on various bohemian and hippie influences, that, at its height in 2004-5, was associated particularly with actress Sienna Miller and model Kate Moss in the United Kingdom and Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen and Nicole Richie in the United States. This trend had been going on since late 2000 and appeared to be on the wane by early 2009.
“Boho” is an abbreviation of bohemian. Vanessa Nicholson (granddaughter of Vanessa Bell, one of the pivotal figures of the unconventional, but influential “Bloomsbury Group” in the first half of the 20th century) has described it as a “curious slippery adjective”. Although the original Bohemians were travellers or refugees from central Europe (the French bohémien translates as “Gypsy or Roma people”), the term has, as Nicholson noted, “attached itself to individuals as disparate as Jesus Christ, Shakespeare and Sherlock Holmes”. The writer and historian A. N. Wilson remarked that, “in his dress-sense as in much else”, Winston Churchill was “pre-First World War Bohemian”, his unbleached linen suit causing surprise when he arrived in Canada in 1943.

In Arthur Conan Doyle’s first short story about Holmes for The Strand, Doctor Watson noted that the detective “loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul” and “remained in our lodgings in Baker-street, buried among his old books and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition..”. Designer Savannah Miller, elder sister of actress Sienna Miller, described a “real bohemian” as “someone who has the ability to appreciate beauty on a deep level, is a profound romantic, doesn’t know any limits, whose world is their own creation, rather than living in a box”.”Chic” was borrowed from French in the late 19th century and has come to mean stylish or elegant.
The boho look, which owed much to the hippie styles of the late 1960s, became especially popular after Sienna Miller’s appearance at the Glastonbury Festival in 2004, although some of its features were apparent from photographs of her taken in October 2003 and of others living in or around the postal district of W10 (North Kensington), an area of London associated with bohemian culture since the mid-1950s.

By the spring of 2005, boho was almost ubiquitous in parts of London and was invading stores in almost every British high street. Its adherents were sometimes referred to as “Siennas”., this eponym even being applied to Miller herself: “Sienna’s Sienna-ishness”, as Jessica Brinton put it in the Sunday Times in 2007 . Features included “floaty” skirts (notably long white ones), furry gilets, embroidered tunics, cropped jackets, large faux-coin belts, sheepskin (“Ugg”) boots and cowboy boots, baggy cardigans and “hobo bags”. Demand was so great that there were allegations the following year of some sub-contractors’ having used cheap child labour in India for zari embroidery and beading.

Footless tights or “leggings”, of which Miller was a proponent, were a contributory factor in the halving of sales of stockings in Britain between 2003 and 2007 .

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