Serena Williams Biography (1981-)

serena-williamsAmerican player. Born Serena Jameka Williams on September 26, 1981, in Saginaw, Michigan. The youngest of Richard and Oracene Williams’ five daughters, , along with her sister Venus, has at various times throughout her career dominated the sport, capturing 11 Grand Slam singles titles and 10 doubles championships.

Serena’s father—a former sharecropper from Louisiana determined to see his two youngest girls succeed—used what he’d gleaned from tennis books and videos to instruct Serena and Venus on how to play the game. At the age of three, practicing on a court not far from the family’s new Compton, California, home, Serena withstood the rigors of daily two-hour practices from her father.

The fact that the family had relocated to Compton was no accident. With its high rate of gang activity, Richard Williams wanted to expose his daughters to the ugly possibilities of life “if they did not work hard and get an education.” In this setting, on courts that were riddled with potholes and sometimes missing nets, Serena and Venus cut their teeth on the game of tennis and the requirements for persevering in a tough climate.

By 1991, Serena was 46-3 on the junior United States Tennis Association tour, and ranked first in the 10-and-under division. Sensing his girls needed better instruction to become successful professionals, he moved his family again—this time to Florida. There, Richard let go of some of his coaching responsibilities, but not the management of Serena and Venus’ career. Wary of his daughters burning out too quickly, he scaled back their junior tournament schedule.

In 1995, Serena turned pro. Two years later, she was already No. 99 in the world rankings—up from 304 just 12 months before. A year later, she graduated high school, and almost immediately inked a $12 million shoe deal with Puma. In 1999, she beat out her sister in their race to the family’s first Grand Slam win, when she captured the U.S. Open title.

It set the stage for a run of high-powered, high profile victories for both Williams sisters. Over the next decade, Serena alone would win 23 Grand Slam titles—including 10 doubles championships with her sister Venus.

With their signature style and play, Venus and Serena changed the look of their sport as well. Their sheer power and athletic ability overwhelmed opponents, and their sense of style and presence made them stand-out celebrities on the court.

Proving to have much more than just tennis clout, Serena expanded her brand into film, television, and fashion. She developed her own “Aneres” line of clothing, and in 2002 People magazine selected her as one of its 25 Most Intriguing People. Essence magazine later called her one of the country’s 50 Most Inspiring African-Americans. She’s also made television appearances, and lent her voice to shows such as The Simpsons.

In 2002, she won the French Open, the U.S. Open, and Wimbledon, defeating Venus in the finals of each tournament. She captured her first Australian Open in 2003, making her one of only five women players to have complete grand slam sets. The win also fulfilled her desire to finish off what she’d dubbed “The Serena Slam.” In 2008, she won the U.S. Open and teamed with Venus to capture a second women’s doubles Olympic gold medal at the Beijing Games.

But Serena has had her scrapes and losses. In 2003, her sister Yetunde Price was murdered in Los Angeles, California. Three years later, Serena seemed burned out. Bitten by injuries, and just a general lack of motivation to stay fit or compete at the same level she once had, Serena saw her tennis ranking slump to 139.

Serena credits her faith as a Jehovah’s Witness, as well as a life-changing journey she made to West Africa for renewing her pride and competitive fire. By 2009, Williams had released a new autobiography, Queen of the Court, and won her place back atop the world’s rankings.

But not everything went smoothly. Williams made headlines in September of that year, when she blasted a lineswomen for a foot-fault called near the end of a semi-final loss to eventual champion Kim Clijsters at the U.S. Open. The profanity-laced outburst included finger pointing and, according to the lineswoman, an alleged threat from Serena against her life.

Williams downplayed what happened, refuting the allegation that she’d threatened the woman. But the incident did not go over well with the tennis viewing public, nor the U.S. Tennis Association, which fined her $10,000 on the spot. Two months later, she was placed on two-year probation and ordered to pay another $82,500 to the Grand Slam committee for the episode&mdashthe largest punishment ever levied against a .

By early 2010, however, Serena was doing her best to move past the incident, gearing up for the upcoming Australian Open and continuing on with a career that only a few have matched in terms of success. “I would like to leave a mark,” Serena once said about her standing in the tennis world. “I think obviously I will, due to the fact that I’m doing something different in tennis. But I don’t think I could ever reach something like a Martina Navratilova, I don’t think I’d ever play that long, but who knows? I think I’ll leave a mark regardless.”

Serena Williams lives in Palm Beach, Florida, with her sister Venus and their two dogs, a Jack Russell terrier and a Maltese.

On the advice of her doctors, top-ranked tennis star Serena Williams withdrew from the U.S. Open on Friday. The 28-year-old champion, who is still recovering from recent foot surgery, said in a written statement that she was pulling out of the tournament “with much frustration and deep sadness.”

Williams was reportedly hurt by broken glass at a restaurant while she was in Munich, Germany. The injury came shortly after her Wimbledon singles win, and required surgery in mid July. Williams said doctors advised her not to play so her foot could properly heal. She already pulled out of several tournaments in which she was scheduled to compete, including the World Team Tennis competition. She described missing the U.S. Open, which starts August 30, as “one of the most devastating moments of my career.”

According to the U.S. Tennis Association, Williams will become the first No. 1-ranked female to miss the U.S. Open since the rankings began in 1975.

2 Comments

  1. Carl Youkay

    January 20, 2010 at 4:50 am

    Hi Serena for over 5 years I hav been following your tennis exploites, and any time I set my eyes on you I fill like grabibg you all to my self how can I do that my dear angel, with lots of love.

  2. Carl Youkay

    January 20, 2010 at 4:52 am

    with lots of Love from Africa(Nigeria)

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